Dyson Keeps Turning Off? Here’s What To Do

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Has this ever happened to you? When you are vacuuming with your Dyson, then it suddenly switches off. So, why does your Dyson keep turning off after a few seconds or minutes?

A Dyson vacuum that keeps turning off even when it’s fully charged is most likely a battery problem. In other words, the battery has run its course and is no longer able to hold a charge. Alternatively, your Dyson will automatically turn off if there is blockage in the airways for safety purposes.

A blockage in the airways can be caused by a clogged filter or a full dust container. In this article, you learn how to fix your Dyson even when it keeps turning off after a few seconds or minutes.

Why Robot Vacuum Going in Circles
Why Robot Vacuum Going in Circles

Why Dyson shuts off after a few seconds or minutes

There are 5 reasons why a Dyson keeps turning off. It could be that the airways are blocked, the filter is clogged, or the dust container is full. If your Dyson is cordless, the battery may no longer be able to hold a charge. If your Dyson is corded, the cable may be damaged. Here are the reasons explained: 

1. The airways are blocked

One of the most common reasons why your Dyson keeps turning off is due to blockage in the airways. Dyson designed their vacuums to automatically shut off when the airflow is blocked for safety purposes.

This prevents the device from overheating because it needs consistent airflow to work. A blockage in the airways can cause the Dyson vacuum to work extra hard and damage itself in the long run.

Newer Dyson models (Dyson V11 upwards) will show you the “Airways blocked” message on the LCD screen. However, older models will tell you there is a blockage via the indicator light on the bottom of the handle.

To solve this issue, you’ll need to check for blockages within the device, including inside the wand of cordless models and inside the hose on cylinder and upright models. Other places you’ll need to check are the tool attachments, particularly the cleaner head, which may collect tangled hair.

2. The filter is clogged

If no visible blockages present themselves, it may be worth cleaning the filters, particularly if you haven’t done so in a while. Some Dyson vacuums have just one filter — HEPA or otherwise — while others have two filters: a pre-motor filter and a post-motor filter. You’ll need to make sure they are clean.

Lift the pre-filter out of the cyclone assembly. Rotate the post-filter anti-clockwise until two solid black dots line up, and pull the post-filter off the back of the machine. Wash both filters with water only.

To clean the pre-filter, turn the pre-filter upside down and tap to remove any excess debris. Run water over the outside of the pre-filter. Repeat the process until the water runs clear. Squeeze and twist with both hands to make sure the excess water is removed.

To clean the post-filter, run water into the open side of the post-filter, then tap and shake the filter to expel all debris. Tap the filter unit to remove any excess water, and leave for at least 24 hours to dry, in a warm place with plenty of airflow. Make sure the both filters are completely dry before refitting.

Refit the pre-filter into the cyclone assembly, then refit the post-filter into the back of the machine. First, align the two solid black dots, then rotate clockwise until the solid black dot lines up with the empty circle. You can buy additional filters so you can continue to use the machine while your filter is drying.

Dyson V10 will tell you the filter needs cleaning via the indicator light on the bottom of the handle. On the other hand, Dyson V11 and newer models will tell you via the LCD screen. 

3. The dust container is full

This particular problem is pretty self-explanatory. Your Dyson vacuum won’t be able to pick up dirt if its dust container is full. Empty the dust container so your Dyson can continue working again.

4. If your Dyson is cordless, the battery may no longer hold a charge

If your Dyson keeps turning off even when you’ve removed all the blockages from the airways, clean the filter, and empty the dust container, then the battery is no longer able to hold a charge.

Like most electrical devices, a cordless Dyson vacuum runs on lithium-ion batteries, which degrade over time. Typically, a lithium-ion battery has a lifespan between 3 to 5 years, depending on usage.

To check the battery, fully charge your Dyson vacuum. If your Dyson turns off after a few seconds or minutes, then its battery is no longer able to hold a charge. You need to replace the battery.

A Dyson battery replacement is very simple and can be done within a few steps. You can learn more about Dyson battery replacement for each model right here, including how to make the battery last longer.

5. If you Dyson is corded, the cable may be damaged

On the other hand, if your Dyson is corded and it keeps shutting off, then the cable may be damaged. Look for any signs of damage to the cable. If it's damaged, please don't plug in or attempt to use your machine in this condition. Contact the Dyson Helpline for advice.

If there are no signs of damage on the cable, make sure your Dyson vacuum is plugged into a working wall socket. Check that the plug has a working fuse. It may sound simple, but a faulty outlet can be the cause.

Final words

As you can see, figuring out why your Dyson keeps turning off is very simple and can be done within a few steps. Hopefully, this article has helped you and your Dyson can continue running for years to come!